Search in the Abstract Database

Search Abstracts 2013

* = Presenting author

P416. Patients' beliefs and attitudes to their treatment of inflammatory bowel disease: multicenter study

K.O. Kim1, B.I. Jang1, E.S. Kim2, E.Y. Kim3, C.H. Yang4, 1Yeungnam University College of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterogy, Department of Internal Medicine, Daegu, South Korea, 2Kyemyung University College of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Daegu, South Korea, 3Catholic University of Daegu School of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Daegu, South Korea, 4Dongguk University College of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kyungju, South Korea

Background

Adherence to the maintenance treatment in the inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been known as an important factor to maintain remission. According to studies about the other chronic disease, nonadherence is associated with negative attitudes to their treatment. The aim of this study was to assess the adherence rate, patients' beliefs and attitudes to the treatment for IBD and predicting factors for adherence using specific questionnaire.

Methods

Two hundred nine patients from the academy hospital of Daegukyungbook Gastrointestinal Study Group (DGSG) were included in the survey and they were taught to complete the questionnaire assessing adherence to medication (Medication Adherence Report Scale, MARS) and beliefs and attitudes (Beliefs about Medications Questionnaires, BMQ).

Results

Among them, 200 patients who completely filled the questionnaire were enrolled. Using the cutoff score of 16/20 on MARS, 44 patients were reported to non-adherent to their medication and medication possession rate was 78%. Eight-four percent of the patients believed that they followed well the prescription. According to the attitude analysis using BMQ, half (53%) of the patients felt high necessity and concern about their medication (ambivalent) and 35.5% of the patients showed “accepting” (high necessity, low concerns) to their treatment. By multivariate analysis, female, patients with adverse effects and busy work showed significantly low adherence to medical treatment. Patients with belief of high necessity about medication (accepting, ambivalent) to their disease were significant predictive factors to medication adherence in IBD.

Conclusion

Twenty-two percent of patients with IBD were low adherence to their medical treatment. Patients' belief of the high necessity of their medication significantly enhances the adherence. Interventions such as education about the efficacy and safety of their medication should be considered to facilitate optimal adherence to medical treatment for IBD.