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P459. Impact of inflammatory bowel disease on patients' daily life: An online Korean Association for the Study of Intestinal Disease (KASID) survey

Y.S. Kim1, S.A. Jung2, K.M. Lee3, S.J. Park4, T.O. Kim5, C.-H. Choi6, H.G. Kim7, W. Moon8, C.M. Moon9, H.K. Song2, S.-Y. Na10, S.-K. Yang11, 1Seoul National University Hospital Healthcare System Gangnam center, Internal Medicine, Seoul, Korea, Republic of, 2Ewha University school of Medicine, Internal Medicine, Seoul, Korea, Republic of, 3The Catholic University College of Medicine, Internal Medicine, Seoul, Korea, Republic of, 4Yonsei University College of Medicine, Internal Medicine, Seoul, Korea, Republic of, 5Haeundae Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Internal Medicine, Seoul, Korea, Republic of, 6Chung-Ang University College of Medicine, Internal Medicine, Seoul, Korea, Republic of, 7Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Internal Medicine, Seoul, Korea, Republic of, 8Kosin University College of Medicine, Internal Medicine, Seoul, Korea, Republic of, 9Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University College of Medicine, Internal Medicine, Seoul, Korea, Republic of, 10Jeju National University School of Medicine, Internal Medicine, Seoul, Korea, Republic of, 11Ulsan University College of Medicine, Internal Medicine, Seoul, Korea, Republic of

Background

Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are chronic disabling gastrointestinal disorders impacting on a patient's quality of life. The incidence and prevalence of IBD is rapidly increasing in Korea. However, limited data are available regarding impacting of IBD on a patient's life in Korea. The aim of the survey was to investigate the impact of IBD on patient's daily lives.

Methods

Self-administered, computer-aided internet-based questionnaires were distributed to members of Korean patients' organization for IBD from March to April 2013 by Korean Association for the Study of Intestinal Disease (KASID).

Results

Surveys were completed by 599 patients with IBD [Crohn's disease (CD): 388; ulcerative colitis (UC): 211]. Most respondents (84%) reported to be in chronically active conditions, whereas 16% were in remission. Approximately two-thirds of patients (65%) had been hospitalized in the past 5 years due to IBD, rising to 76% among the patients with CD. In addition, 38% patients needed emergency care before their diagnosis. Most patients (81%) felt tired, weak and worn out in daily life during a flare-up; this was reduced to 61% during remission. The patients have taken 18 days off work or school because of illness in the past 6 months, and 64% of patients felt stress or pressure about taking time off work or school due to IBD. Forty-six percent of patients reported having received unfair comments at work, or having suffered discrimination. More than half (62%) of patients were unable to perform their full potential in an education setting. Forty-seven percent of patients felt IBD had negatively affected their income and earnings. More than half (61%) of patients reported that IBD had prevented them from pursuing intimate relationships. Whereas, most patients (70%) said that membership of a patient's organization has a beneficial impact on their life.

Conclusion

IBD significantly impacts on the patients' daily life including work, educations, and social relationships. Effective medical consultation should address the patient's full life context.