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* = Presenting author

P691 Budget impact analysis of introducing biosimilar infliximab for the treatment of gastro intestinal disorders in five European countries

A. Jha*1, W. Dunlop1, A. Upton2

1Mundipharma International Ltd., Market Access, Cambridge, United Kingdom, 2Abacus International, Health Economics and Outcomes Research, Bicester, United Kingdom

Background

Biosimilar infliximab has been approved by EMA for the management of inflammatory autoimmune disorders, including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis (UC), based on quality, safety and efficacy profiles comparable to those of infliximab. The aim of this study was to evaluate the one-year budget impact of introducing biosimilar infliximab in the management of Crohn's disease and UC from the healthcare system perspective.

Methods

An Excel-based budget impact model with a one-year time horizon was developed. The numbers of patients eligible for infliximab were calculated based on disease incidence and prevalence rates in Germany, Italy, Belgium, the Netherlands and the UK. The price of biosimilar infliximab was not yet known; therefore three discount scenarios versus infliximab (10%, 20%, and 30%) were applied. For patients currently treated with infliximab (switch population), the biosimilar infliximab market share was assumed to be 25% in all scenarios, whereas it was assumed to be 50% in all scenarios for newly diagnosed patients. We calculated the numbers of additional patients that could potentially be treated with biosimilar infliximab, if the projected savings due to the introduction of biosimilar infliximab were used: Savings made in the naïve and switch patient groups were to be used to treat additional treatment-naïve and switch patients, respectively.

Results

For treatment-naïve and switch patients combined, the projected net budget savings over one year due to the introduction of biosimilar infliximab ranged from € 0.7 million (Italy) to € 17.9 million (Germany) for Crohn's disease, and from € 0.3 million (UK) to € 6.3 million (Germany) for UC, depending on the discount rate applied. For treatment-naïve patients, the corresponding projected savings range from € 48,000 (Italy) to € 1.8 million (Germany) for Crohn's disease and from € 42,000 (UK) to € 1.1 million (Netherlands) for UC. For the switch population, the corresponding projected savings range from € 0.7 million (Italy) to € 16.1 million (Germany) for Crohn's disease and from € 0.3 million (UK) to € 5.3 million (Germany) for UC. If these projected savings were used to treat additional patients with biosimilar infliximab, 64 (Italy) to 1,358 (Germany) additional patients with Crohn's disease and 30 (UK) to 472 (Germany) additional patients with UC could potentially be treated with biosimilar infliximab.

Conclusion

The introduction of biosimilar infliximab as a treatment option for patients with Crohn's disease or UC could achieve substantial cost savings for healthcare systems. These savings could be used to treat additional patients. The net budget impact was highly sensitive to market uptake rates and the price discount applied.