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* = Presenting author

N014 Patient-reported experience measures in inflammatory bowel disease patients at the Stockholm gastro centre

S. Jaghult*1, S. Soto Villagran2, D. Andersson1

1Karolinska Insitutet, Department of clinical sciences, Stockholm, Sweden, 2Stockholm Gastro Centre, Stockholm, Sweden

Background

Patient-reported experience measures (PREM) is a measure of the patient’s experience of and satisfaction with the care that is given by the health care professionals. PREM can include for example participation, information, and confidence. In Sweden, we have traditionally registered PROM (patient-reported outcome measure) in the national registry for IBD patients, SWIBREG (Swedish inflammatory bowel disease registry). PROM is patient-reported outcomes and gives us valuable information about how the patients experience their disease and health. SWIBREG is used in all parts of Sweden, and today, approximately 33 000 patients are registered in the registry. SWIBREG has designed 4 questions measuring PREM, and since June 16, there is a possibility for the patients to report these important data into the registry. The questions concern experience regarding given information, participation, accessibility, and the behaviour of the health care professionals, and a three- and four-graded Likert scale was used.

Methods

All patients that visited the Stockholm Gastro Centre during a 2 month period (September–October 16) were asked to fill in PREM after their visit to either their nurse or physician. All data were then registered into SWIBREG and could be analysed in a descriptive way.

Results

A total of 74 patients answered the PREM questions. Regarding given information, 79.7 % experienced it to be very good, and 18.9% rather good. No patients experienced it to be very bad. In the question about participation, 95.9% of the patients rated that they experienced adequate participation. A total of 73% experienced a very good accessibility, and 25.7% experienced it to be rather good. In the last question about the behaviour of the health care professionals, 94.6% experienced it to be very good, and 5.4% to be rather good. No patients experienced it to be rather or very bad.

Conclusion

By measuring PREM, each clinic gets valuable information about how the patients experience the care. At the Stockholm Gastro Centre the PREM data showed that most patients experienced the behaviour of the health care professionals to be very good, and most patients experienced adequate participation. The experience of given information showed that many patients rated it to be very good, but in this area, there is room for improvement. At the Stockholm Gastro Centre, the patients can contact the health care professionals by telephone, SMS, and e-mail. The accessibility is therefore rather good, but perhaps the information about the different contact ways is not clear enough. The PREM data helps each clinic with valuable information about which areas need improvement.