Search in the Abstract Database

Search Abstracts 2016

* = Presenting author

P752 A reduction of the butyrate-producing microbiota in Asian patients with ulcerative colitis

Y. T. Jeen, E. S. Kim*, B. Keum, J. S. Koo

Korea University College of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul, South Korea

Background

Alteration of intestinal microbiota is associated with onset and pathogenesis with inflammatory disease. In European research, reduction of butyrate-producing bacteria was demonstrated in the ulcerative colitis (UC) patients. Pathogenesis and epidemiology of Asian UC patients are differ from European or American patients. However, there are no data for Asian UC patient’s gut microbiota and reduction of butyrate-producing bacteria. Therefore, we evaluated alteration of but microbiota, especially butyrate-producing bacteria, and if we could document of specific butyrate-producing bacteria, we then assessed the bacterial effect on mucin production in-vitro study using normal and colon cancer cell lines.

Methods

Butyrate-producing bacterias (Faecalibacterium praunsnitzii, Clostridium leptum, Clostridium coccides/Eubacterium rectale, Roseburia intestinalis, and Bacteroides uniformis) from 22 UC patients in mild or maintenance of remission status and 25 age and sex-matched healthy controls were analysed. Predominantly reduced bacteria was selected from our UC patients group. We treated with the bacteria to normal colon cell line (NCM 460) and colon cancer cell line (HT-29). After 24 hours, mRNA of MUC2, CAMP, LL-37 were analysed, which related with mucosal producing or synthesis of cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide.

Results

Clostridium coccides/Eubacterium rectale, Roseburia intestinalis, and Bacteroides uniformis were reduced in UC patients significantly (p = 0.002, 0.008, and 0.024, respectively). Further, Faecalibacterium praunsnitzii and Clostridium leptum had the tendency that reduced in UC (p = 0.078 and 0.089). Eubacterium rectale was selected to in-vitro study using normal and colon cancer cell lines. MUC2, CAMP, and LL-37 were elevated significantly after treated Eubacterium rectale treatment (p < 0.05).

Conclusion

The composition of the faecal microbiota of UC patients differs from that of healthy individuals. We found a reduction in Clostridium coccides/Eubacterium rectale, Roseburia intestinalis, and Bacteroides uniformis, which are well-known butyrate-producing bacteria. E rectale improve the mucin producing markers in intro study using colon cancer cell lines. These results suggest that reduction of butyrate-producing bacterial species contribute to the pathogenesis of Asian UC patients.