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P637 MMP-2 and -8 degraded and citrullinated-vimentin (VICM) correlates to disease activity in inflammatory bowel diseases

L. Godskesen1, M. Lindholm2, J. Høg Mortensen2, A. Krag1, T. Manon-Jensen2, M. Karsdal2, J. Kjeldsen1

1Odense University Hospital, Department of Medical Gastroenterology, Odense, Denmark, 2Nordic Bioscience, Biomarkers and Research, Herlev, Denmark

Background

Vimentin is a type III intermediate filament protein that stabilises cell architecture, but might be more active involved in intestinal inflammation during Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). In lamina propria vimentin is found fibroblast and myofibroblasts, but are also produced by activated macrophages in inflammatory diseases. Protein fragments from vimentin turnover can be measured by competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) targeting MMP-2 and -8 degraded and citrullinated-vimentin (VICM) and thereby maybe act as a serological biomarker of intestinal inflammation. The aim of this study was to evaluate how VICM correlates to clinical and endoscopic disease activity in CD and UC.

Methods

We included 63 CD patients, 107 UC patients and 20 healthy controls in a prospective biomarker evaluation study. Thirty-five per cent (n = 24) of CD patients and 49% (n = 52) of UC patients had active disease. We recorded Harvey–Bradshaw Index (HBI) or Simple Clinical Colitis Activity Index (SCCAI), and measured VICM, C-reactive protein (CRP), and faecal calprotectin (FC). Seventeen CD and 63 UC patients underwent sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy and were scored with Simple Endoscopic Score for Crohn’s disease (SES-CD) or Endoscopic Mayo Score.

Results

VICM was significantly elevated in CD and UC patients compared with healthy controls (p = 0.0001). VICM correlated positively to SES-CD, SCCAI and Endoscopic Mayo Score (Figures 1B and 2A and B), and had a tendency to correlate to HBI (Figure 1A). VICM had a stronger correlation to the endoscopic scores than CRP (Figures 1B, D and 2B, D), but not as strong a correlation as FC (Figures 1A, E and 2A, E).

Figure 1. VICM, CRP, and f-calprotectin in relation to disease activity in CD patients.

Figure 2. VICM, CRP, and f-calprotectin in relation to disease activity in UC patients.

Conclusion

VICM is significantly elevated in IBD patients in remission and IBD patients with active disease compared with healthy controls. Furthermore, VICM correlates significantly to endoscopic disease activity in CD and to clinical and endoscopic activity in UC. VICM has a higher correlation to the endoscopic scores compared with CRP. As VICM is produced locally in the inflamed gut and CRP is a systemic inflammation marker produced in the liver, VICM could be a more direct marker of the inflammation in the gut. Thus VICM might act as a serological biomarker of inflammation in the intestinal wall in IBD.