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P797 Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis was associated with different lipid profile disorders: a nationwide population-based study

H. Soh*1, J. Chun1, K. Han2, S. Park1, E. A. Kang1, J. P. Im1, J. S. Kim1

1Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine and Liver Research Institute, Seoul, South Korea, 2The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Department of Medical Statistics, Seoul, South Korea

Background

The relationships between lipid profiles and the risk for developing inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) including Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) still remains elusive. We conducted a nationwide population-based cohort study to investigate the relationship between lipid profiles and the risk for developing IBD.

Methods

We conducted a retrospective study using claims data from the National Healthcare Insurance (NHI) service in Korea. A total of 9,706,026 subjects who received medical check-ups arranged by NHI in 2009 were included and followed up until 2016. Serum lipid profiles, including total cholesterol, triglyceride (TG), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) were collected. Individuals who developed CD and UC were identified during the follow-up.

Results

After a mean follow-up of 7.3 years, IBD was detected in 7,058 (0.073%) individuals. IBD group showed a significantly lower prevalence of hypertension, diabetes and dyslipidaemia, compared with non-IBD controls (p-value < 0.001 for each variable). IBD group was inversely associated with serum fasting glucose, serum total cholesterol, LDL-C, HDL-C and TG levels (p-value < 0.001 for each variable). Compared with the highest quartile (Q4) of serum total cholesterol, low serum total cholesterol was associated with higher risk of CD (adjusted hazard ratio [HR]: Q1, 2.52; Q2, 1.52; Q3, 1.27; p-value: Q1, < 0.001; Q2, < 0.001; Q3, 0.042), but not UC. Compared with the highest quartile (Q4) of LDL-C, low serum LDL-C was associated with higher risk of CD (adjusted HR: Q1, 1.92; Q2, 1.47; Q3, 1.22; p-value: Q1, < 0.001; Q2, < 0.001; Q3, 0.078), but not UC. Moreover, compared with the highest quartile (Q4) of HDL-C, low serum HDL-C was associated with higher rates of CD (adjusted HR: Q1, 2.49; Q2, 1.90; Q3 1.43; p-value: Q1, < 0.001; Q2, < 0.001; Q3, 0.002), but not UC. In contrast, low serum TG was associated with higher risk of UC (adjusted HR: Q1, 1.22; Q2, 1.19; Q3, 1.19; p-value < 0.001 for each quartile), but not CD.

Conclusion

Low serum total cholesterol, LDL-C and HDL-C were associated with the risk for developing CD, but low serum TG was related to the risk for developing UC.