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DOP76 No durable impact of COVID-19 on disease activity and microbiome composition in patients with IBD

Funez-dePagnier, G.(1);Lima, S.(1);Duenas-Bianchi, L.(1);Lai, D.(1);Ahmed, W.(1);Battat, R.(1);Scherl, E.(1);Lukin, D.(1);Longman, R.(1)

(1)Weill Cornell Medicine, Medicine, New York, United States

Background

Although patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) reported an increased frequency of gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms following infection, the durable impact of COVID-19 on underlying IBD is not well defined.

Methods

In 118 IBD patients with COVID-19, clinical and endoscopic IBD activity, laboratory markers (ESR, CRP, hemoglobin (Hb), fecal calprotectin(FCP)), and medication utilization was assessed up to 6 months post-infection and compared to during infection or up to 6 months prior to infection.  Active disease was defined by a Harvey Bradshaw Index > 4, Mayo Score ≥2, SES-CD ≥2, Mayo endoscopic score ≥1.  16S rRNA analysis was used to evaluate microbiome composition in a subset of 12 patients before and after COVID-19.

Results

Although upper respiratory (86.6%) and new GI symptoms (39.1%) were common in patients with IBD, there was no significant change in IBD clinical disease activity (Pre vs. Post-COVID-19 HBI: 4.7 vs. 4.9; partial Mayo: 3.0 vs. 2.1), endoscopic evaluation (Pre vs. Post-COVID-19 SES-CD: 7.2 vs. 8.9, Mayo endoscopic score: 1.5 vs. 1.7), or laboratory markers (Pre vs. Post-COVID-19 CRP: 1.2 vs. 1.3; ESR: 25 vs. 26; Hb 12.8 vs. 13.2; FCP: 388 vs. 250) up to 7 months post-COVID-19 compared to the 6 months prior to infection (Table 1). Overall active disease was present in 60% of the cohort prior to COVID-19 and 55% and 59% during and post-COVID-19, respectively.  More subjects (8.5%) reported a delay in medical therapy during COVID-19, but there were no differences in the need for corticosteroids, a change in medical therapy, or IBD-related surgery or hospitalization during or post-COVID-19 compared to the prior 6 months.   Microbiome composition stratified by underlying IBD disease activity, but did not show significant change post-COVID-19 (Figure 1).

Conclusion

COVID-19 showed no durable impact on clinical IBD disease activity or microbiome composition supporting guidelines for continued maintenance care.

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