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ECCO News keeps ECCO Members up-to-date on what is going on within the organisation and reports on IBD activities taking place within Europe. Since Spring 2006, ECCO News has maintained the flow of information between Members of the organisation. 

ECCO News is an important part of the European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation’s ambition to create a European standard of IBD care and to promote knowledge and research in the field of IBD. ECCO Members automatically receive this publication four times a year. 

Editor

 

Associate Editors

Willem BemelmanWillem Bemelman
© ECCO
                  Nuha Yassin v3Nuha Yassin
© ECCO
Ignacio Catalán Serra 2019Ignacio Catalán-Serra
© Ignacio Catalán-Serra

Latest ECCO News Content


11October2019

Interview with N-ECCO National Representative Belgium

BelgiumEveline Hoefkens
© Eveline Hoefkens

Belgium   Belgium

N-ECCO National Representative:
Eveline Hoefkens
Job Title:
 IBD Nurse

 


 

What influenced your decision to apply for the role of N-ECCO National Representative for your country?

By being a national representative, you are actively involved in N-ECCO meetings. The yearly national representatives meeting at the ECCO Congress is the ideal place to expand your network. You interact with IBD nurses from other countries and share experiences. It is a great opportunity to create an international network. 

Posted in Volume 14, Issue 3, ECCO News, ECCO Country Member Profiles, N-ECCO

11October2019

Interview with N-ECCO National Representative Croatia

CroatiaNensi Lusičić 
© Nensi Lusičić
Croatia Vesna OrozVesna Oroz
© Vesna Oroz

Croatia   Croatia

N-ECCO National Representative:
Nensi Lusičić
Job Title:
 IBD Nurse

 


 

What influenced your decision to apply for the role of N-ECCO National Representative for your country?
Opportunity to become more involved in IBD.

Posted in Volume 14, Issue 3, ECCO News, ECCO Country Member Profiles, N-ECCO

11October2019

ECCO Country Member Profiles: United Kingdom

Ian Arnott and Tariq Ahmad, ECCO National Representatives, United Kingdom

Tariq Ahmad
Tariq Ahmad 
© Tariq Ahmad
UK Arnott Ian
Ian Arnott
© Ian Arnott
United Kingdom

  United Kingdom

Name of group: The IBD section of the British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG).
Number of active members: Approx. The IBD section is the largest section of the BSG and has 997 members including physicians, surgeons, pathologists, radiologists, scientists, nurses, dietitians, and others interested in IBD. The IBD section committee includes nurse, trainee and patient group membership.
Number of meetings per year: The BSG holds an annual national meeting in June with two or three IBD symposia. In addition, the BSG supports or endorses numerous regional gut clubs and network meetings across the UK each year. Many of these are focused on IBD. The IBD section includes the IBD clinical research group which leads research activity across the UK.
This group holds an annual meeting every November to which all investigators are invited. In 2018, 120 delegates attended, including physicians, research nurses and research co-ordinators. 
President and Secretary: BSG president – Cathryn Edwards BSG secretary - Adrian Stanley Chairman, IBD section of the BSG – Ian Arnott Chairman of IBD clinical research group – Charlie Lees
National Representatives: Tariq Ahmad, Exeter and Ian Arnott, Edinburgh. Lynn Gray, Wirral University Hospital and Catherine Stansfield, Salford Royal are the UK representatives of N-ECCO. 
Joined ECCO in: 2003
Incidence of IBD in the country: Recent data from Scotland reveal incidence rates for UC, CD and IBDU of 19.8, 13.6 and 5.4 per 100,000 respectively (Jones GR Gut 2019)

Posted in ECCO News, Volume 14, Issue 3, ECCO Country Member Profiles

11October2019

ECCO Country Member Profiles: Denmark

Jørn Brynskov and Signe Wildt, ECCO National Representatives, Denmark

Denmark

  Denmark

Name of group: There is an interest group for IBD, but gastroenterologists with an interest in IBD are organised in “Dansk Selskab for Gastroenterologi og Hepatologi” (DSGH), which is our national society of gastroenterology and hepatology.
Number of active members: Approx. 750 members of DSGH
Number of meetings per year: There is one annual meeting lasting 2 days. In addition, a number of minor meetings are held throughout the year, one or two of which have an IBD focus. 
President and Secretary: President: Ebbe Langholz, Department of Gastroenterology, Herlev-Gentofte University Hospital Secretary: Annette Dam Fialla, Department of Gastroenterology, Odense University Hospital
National Representatives: Jørn Brynskov, Department of Gastroenterology, Herlev-Gentofte University Hospital Signe Wildt, Department of Gastroenterology, Køge University Hospital
Joined ECCO in: Denmark has been a member of ECCO since 2004
Incidence of IBD in the country: Crohn´s disease:10/100,000    Ulcerative colitis: 15/100,000

Posted in ECCO News, Volume 14, Issue 3, ECCO Country Member Profiles

11October2019

Complications while waiting for IBD surgery

Karin A. Wasmann, on behalf of the IBD study group Amsterdam UMC, location AMC

foto Karin zwart wit v3
Karin A. Wasmann 
© Karin A. Wasmann

Karin A. Wasmann1, IBD study group Amsterdam UMC, location AMC2

While striving to meet the quality standards for oncological care, hospitals prioritise oncological procedures more frequently, resulting in longer waiting times for surgery for benign diseases such as Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD). Currently in the Netherlands, oncological treatment should be started within six weeks after diagnosis and this is reinforced by the Dutch Health Care Inspectorate, insurance companies and patient organisations [1]. The situation in other European countries is similar. Additionally, since the introduction of national bowel cancer screening programmes, the demand for oncological surgical resections has risen worldwide [2–5]. The subsequent longer waiting time for benign diseases is not only inconvenient for patients, but in the case of IBD may lead to severe complications.

Posted in Volume 14, Issue 3, ECCO News

11October2019

Y-ECCO Interview Corner: Fiona Powrie

Charlotte Hedin, Y-ECCO Member

Charlotte HedinCharlotte Hedin
© ECCO

Professor Fiona Powrie is the Director of the Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology at the University of Oxford. Her work has been seminal in defining the mechanisms that govern and regulate immune responses in the gut. Her research has revealed the pivotal role of regulatory T cells, interleukin-10, interleukin-23 and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) in intestinal inflammation.

Posted in ECCO News, Volume 14, Issue 3, Committee News, Y-ECCO

11October2019

Y-ECCO Literature Review: Sailish Honap

Sailish Honap

No association between pseudopolyps and colorectal neoplasia in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases

Mahmoud R, Shah SC, Ten Hove JR, Torres J, Mooiweer E, Castaneda D, Glass J, Elman J, Kumar A, Axelrad J, Ullman T, Colombel JF, Oldenburg B, Itzkowitz SH; Dutch Initiative on Crohn and Colitis

Gastroenterology. 2019;156:1333–44.e3.

Introduction

Sailish Honap picture
Sailish Honap
© Sailish Honap

Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) are at an increased risk of developing high-grade dysplasia and colorectal carcinoma [1, 2]. The risk of carcinogenesis, driven by chronic inflammation, increases with several factors, including duration and anatomic extent of colitis, family history and the presence of primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). European clinical guidelines for colonoscopy surveillance in this high-risk cancer population also suggest a shorter surveillance interval for those with post-inflammatory polyps (PIPs), also known as pseudopolyps [3–5]. PIPs are a common finding, more so in Ulcerative Colitis (UC) than in Crohn’s Disease, and are formed after alternating cycles of inflammation and regeneration of the epithelial mucosa. However, data are conflicting and evidence is lacking in this field as previous case control studies have reported up to a 2.5-fold increased risk [6, 7] whereas a more recent cohort study showed no significant association between PIPs and colorectal neoplasia (CRN) [8]. The authors of this study aimed to use a large cohort study to further define the risk of CRN and PIPs in patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.  

Posted in Y-ECCO Literature Reviews, ECCO News, Volume 14, Issue 3, Committee News, Y-ECCO

11October2019

Y-ECCO Literature Review: Paul Harrow

Paul Harrow

Crohn’s Disease exclusion diet plus partial enteral nutrition induces sustained remission in a randomized controlled trial

Levine A, Wine E, Assa A, Boneh RS, Shaoul R, Kori M, Cohen S, Peleg S, Shamaly H, On A, Millman P, Abramas L, Ziv-Baran T, Grant S, Abitbol G, Dunn KA, Bielawski JP, Van Limbergen J

Gastroenterology. 2019;157:440–50.

Introduction

Paul Harrow picture
Paul Harrow
© Paul Harrow

Exclusive enteral nutrition (EEN) is a safe and effective induction treatment for Crohn’s Disease (CD). It is recommended as first-line induction therapy in children and adolescents [1]. However, enteral nutrition is less well tolerated than other options like corticosteroids. A recent meta-analysis found three times as many patients withdrew from enteral nutrition therapy compared to corticosteroids even in the supported setting of clinical trials [2]. There is a clear need for a more acceptable dietary intervention. However, our understanding of the role of diet in CD is incomplete and to date specific diets have not been proven to induce remission. 

Posted in Y-ECCO Literature Reviews, ECCO News, Volume 14, Issue 3, Committee News, Y-ECCO

11October2019

Y-ECCO Literature Review: Samantha Campbell

Samantha Campbell

Ustekinumab exposure-outcome analysis in Crohn’s Disease only in part explains limited endoscopic remission rates

Verstockt B, Dreesen E, Noman M, Outtier A, Van den Berghe N, Aerden I, Compernolle G, Van Assche G, Gils A, Vermeire S, Ferrante M

J Crohns Colitis. 2019;13:864–72.

Introduction

Samantha Campbell picture
Samantha Campbell
© Samantha Campbell

Ustekinumab is licenced to treat moderate-severe Crohn’s Disease (CD) [1]. Ustekinumab induction is administered via intravenous (IV) infusion at a dose of 6 mg/kg at week 0, followed by a subcutaneous (SC) maintenance injection of 90 mg at week 8.

The UNITI programme demonstrated that ustekinumab can induce and maintain clinical remission. However, there is a paucity of real-life data in patients with CD receiving the mentioned IV induction and SC maintenance dosing of ustekinumab. Real-life data on therapeutic drug monitoring and biomarkers, such as faecal calprotectin, remain a relatively unexplored area with ustekinumab, with discrepancies in the literature [2, 3]. . 

Posted in Y-ECCO Literature Reviews, ECCO News, Volume 14, Issue 3, Committee News, Y-ECCO

11October2019

Y-ECCO Members’ Address

Dominik Bettenworth, Y-ECCO Chair

Dominik Bettenworth 2Dominik Bettenworth
© ECCO

Dear Y-ECCO Friends,

I hope you all are doing well.

During my summer leave, I read a book on the time horizon principle. The author supposes that the productivity of the most successful people on the planet results from the balance between three core components: Time for yourself, relationships and work. As you all, hopefully, have had sufficient time for yourself and your family during your holidays, here are some ways to expand your (professional) relationships and work skills:  

Posted in ECCO News, Volume 14, Issue 3, Committee News, Y-ECCO