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N07 Patient reported outcome measures collected from patients using a digital tablet: early benefits

P. Avery1, K. Blackmore2, C. Angel1

1Dorset County Hospital, Inflammatory Bowel Disease Nursing, Dorchester, UK, 2Dorset County Hospital, inflammatory bowel disease, Dorchester, UK

Background

At a district general hospital (DGH) on the south coast of England the inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) nurse led service introduced an eHealth system in 2015 linked to the IBD registry but limited to access via a desktop limiting flexibility. In liaison with the IBD registry and the software developer the lead nurse instigated an upgrade to the system. This allows patients access both remotely and via a digital tablet in outpatients. Discussion is being had about the best way to collect patient reported outcome measures (PROMS) both for large data analyse and local patient benefit. This presentation of the first 3 months collection of the PROMS seeks to show the benefit of these data locally

Methods

PROMS were gathered from both Consultant and Nurse led clinics from July 2019 to the 22 October 2019. Patients were asked to fill in the IBD control PROM (this PROM forms part of the IBD registry Data set) on a tablet before entering the consultation room. Additionally a disease activity score either the Harvey Bradshaw Score (HBI) or the Simple Clinical Colitis activity index (SCCAI) is collected at the same time. These scores were then extracted from the system and evaluated using a descriptive data analysis approach.

Results

After Data cleansing 200 records are shown in Table 1 covering all disease sub-types.

Table 1.
Responses By sub typeCDUCIBDUCCTotal
Pain37452185
Sleep loss31322065
Anxiety/Dep29383070
Fatigue516941125
All four20131034
PROM7811372200

Fatigue was the most commonly reported complication of IBD in addition,126 patients who attended outpatients reported a wellness score of above 75 out of 100 isolating the wellness score from the PROM score allowed a comparison with the corresponding disease activity score in these patients and correlated in 95% of UC Patients and CD 84% (see Table 2).

Table 2.
Total well-being100–7675–5150–2425–0Total
UC792194113
IBD34007
CD431814378
CC10012
Total12643238200

Conclusion

Fatigue is a widely reported symptom of IBD as well as pain and anxiety or depression. These data confirm this trend but also present the first local population information for the IBD service at this DGH. When looking at the impact of these scores there is an opportunity to identify patients that may need medically optimising. The patients that remain could then be targeted with support services and a business case for counselling is now planned. In addition to this together with self-testing with IBDoc ® the PROMs and disease activity scores provide opportunity for remote management of some patients. These PROMs collected from patients using a tablet in outpatients at a DGH show promising value for service development.

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