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OP37 Rapidity of symptom improvements during filgotinib induction therapy in patients with Ulcerative Colitis: Post hoc analysis of the phase 2b/3 SELECTION study

Danese, S.(1);Hibi, T.(2);Ritter, T.E.(3);Dinoso, J.B.(4);Hsieh, J.(4);Yun, C.(4);Zhang, J.(4);Zhao, S.(4);Loftus Jr, E.V.(5);Rogler, G.(6)

(1)Humanitas Clinical and Research Center- IRCCS and Humanitas University, Department of Gastroenterology, Milan, Italy;(2)Kitasato Institute Hospital- Kitasato University, Center for Advanced IBD Research and Treatment, Tokyo, Japan;(3)GI Alliance, Department of Research and Education, Southlake- TX, United States;(4)Gilead Sciences, Inc., Foster City, United States;(5)Mayo Clinic, Department of Internal Medicine- Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Rochester- MN, United States;(6)University Hospital of Zurich- University of Zurich, Clinic for Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Zurich, Switzerland

Background

Filgotinib (FIL) is a preferential Janus kinase 1 inhibitor in development for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. SELECTION was a phase 2b/3 randomized, double-blind, placebo (PBO)-controlled trial to evaluate FIL for the treatment of moderately to severely active ulcerative colitis (UC) (NCT02914522). The aim of this post hoc analysis was to assess the speed of improvement in patient-reported outcomes (PROs) during FIL treatment.

Methods

Eligible patients who were biologic-naïve or -experienced were enrolled in induction study A or induction study B, respectively. In each study, patients were randomized 2:2:1 to receive FIL 100 mg, FIL 200 mg or PBO once daily orally for 10 weeks. In this post hoc analysis, data from daily patient diaries up to day 15 of induction, including Mayo stool frequency subscores (SF; range, 0 [normal] to 3 [≥5 stools/day more than normal]) and rectal bleeding subscores (RB; range, 0 [no blood] to 3 [passing blood alone]), were used to evaluate the proportion of patients achieving predefined subscores or subscore reductions.

Results

Induction studies A and B comprised 659 and 689 patients, respectively. Baseline characteristics were similar across treatment groups within induction study A and within induction study B. In induction study A, more patients treated with FIL 200 mg vs PBO reported a reduction in SF of ≥1 from baseline as early as day 6 (FIL 200 mg, 35.8%; PBO, 20.6%, p<0.01) and every day from day 10 (Figure 1), and a reduction in RB of ≥1 from baseline as early as day 4 (FIL 200 mg, 36.9%; PBO, 23.7%; p<0.01) and every day from day 7 (Figure 2). In induction study B, more patients treated with FIL 200 mg vs PBO reported a reduction in SF of ≥1 from baseline as early as day 2 (FIL 200 mg, 21.6%; PBO, 12.1%; p<0.05) (Figure 3) and a reduction in RB of ≥1 from baseline as early as day 3 (FIL 200 mg, 29.5%; PBO, 17.6%; p<0.01) (Figure 4). More patients receiving FIL 200 mg vs PBO achieved the composite score of RB=0 and SF≤1 as early as day 9 in induction study A (FIL 200 mg, 18.8%; PBO, 9.5%, p<0.05). More patients receiving FIL 200 mg vs PBO achieved the composite score of RB=0 and SF≤1 as early as day 7 in induction study B (FIL 200 mg, 10.7%; PBO, 4.2%, p<0.05).

Conclusion

In this post hoc analysis of induction study data from SELECTION, improvements in SF and RB were observed within the first week of therapy with FIL 200 mg, compared with PBO, in patients with moderately to severely active UC. These data demonstrate that FIL 200 mg has rapid onset of action, as assessed by PROs, in both biologic-naïve and biologic-experienced patients.

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