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P192 Frequency of hereditary and acquired thromboembolic complications in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases in Moscow Clinical Scientific Center named after A.S. Loginov

Knyazev, O.(1,2,3);Lishchinskaia, A.(1);Kagramanova, A.(1);Zvyaglova, M.(1);Noskova, K.(4);Kulakov, D.(1,3);Parfenov, A.(5);

(1)Moscow Scientific Center named after A. S. Loginov, Department of IBD, Moscow, Russian Federation;(2)State Scientific Centre of Coloproctology named after A.N. Ryzhyh, Department of IBD, Moscow, Russian Federation;(3)Research Institute of Health Organization and Medical Management, Organization of Coloproctology, Moscow, Russian Federation;(4)Moscow Clinical Scientific Center named after A.S. Loginov, Department of Laboratory Diagnostics, Moscow, Russian Federation;(5)Moscow Clinical Scientific Center named after A.S. Loginov, Department of IBD, Moscow, Russian Federation

Background

Thromboembolic complications (TC), which are one of the characteristic manifestations of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). 

Objective: to identify the frequency of acquired and inherited hypercoagulation factors that contribute to the development of TC in patients with IBD.

Methods

The clinical status of 1238 IBD patients undergoing treatment in 2019 was evaluated in the Department of IBD. 748 patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and 490 patients with Crohn's disease (CD). In 112 patients with IBD (9.0%), clinically significant TC (venous thrombosis of the lower extremities, upper extremities and others) was detected. In patients with clinically significant feasibility studies, DNA isolated from peripheral blood lymphocytes was examined to identify molecular genetic mutations that lead to hypercoagulation.

Results

Of the 112 patients with TC, 76 (67.8%) patients had UC, and 36 (32.2 %) patients had Crohn's disease. Of 112 IBD patients with clinically significant TC, 45 (40.2 %) had genetic mutations that increase affinity for fibrinogen, increase platelet aggregation, disrupt folic acid metabolism, and reduce the activity of the methylentetrahydrofolate reductase enzyme, which may be manifested by a moderate increase in homocysteine levels. 67 patients with IBD (59.8%) did not have genetic mutations that lead to hypercoagulation. Of the 45 IBD patients with clinically significant feasibility studies due to hereditary factors, 30 (66.6%) patients had UC, 15 (33.7%) patients had CD (RR-1.038, 95% CI 0.746-1.444; x2-0.049; p=0.83921).  

Conclusion

Clinically significant feasibility studies were found in 9.0% of IBD patients. More than 40% of patients with clinically significant feasibility studies (n=112) have inherited factors that contribute to the development of feasibility studies. About 60 % of IBD patients with clinically significant feasibility studies do not have hereditary factors that lead to the development of feasibility studies.

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