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11October2019

Y-ECCO Interview Corner: Fiona Powrie

Charlotte Hedin, Y-ECCO Member

Charlotte HedinCharlotte Hedin
© ECCO

Professor Fiona Powrie is the Director of the Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology at the University of Oxford. Her work has been seminal in defining the mechanisms that govern and regulate immune responses in the gut. Her research has revealed the pivotal role of regulatory T cells, interleukin-10, interleukin-23 and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) in intestinal inflammation.

Posted in ECCO News, Volume 14, Issue 3, Committee News, Y-ECCO

11October2019

Y-ECCO Literature Review: Sailish Honap

Sailish Honap

No association between pseudopolyps and colorectal neoplasia in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases

Mahmoud R, Shah SC, Ten Hove JR, Torres J, Mooiweer E, Castaneda D, Glass J, Elman J, Kumar A, Axelrad J, Ullman T, Colombel JF, Oldenburg B, Itzkowitz SH; Dutch Initiative on Crohn and Colitis

Gastroenterology. 2019;156:1333–44.e3.

Introduction

Sailish Honap picture
Sailish Honap
© Sailish Honap

Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) are at an increased risk of developing high-grade dysplasia and colorectal carcinoma [1, 2]. The risk of carcinogenesis, driven by chronic inflammation, increases with several factors, including duration and anatomic extent of colitis, family history and the presence of primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). European clinical guidelines for colonoscopy surveillance in this high-risk cancer population also suggest a shorter surveillance interval for those with post-inflammatory polyps (PIPs), also known as pseudopolyps [3–5]. PIPs are a common finding, more so in Ulcerative Colitis (UC) than in Crohn’s Disease, and are formed after alternating cycles of inflammation and regeneration of the epithelial mucosa. However, data are conflicting and evidence is lacking in this field as previous case control studies have reported up to a 2.5-fold increased risk [6, 7] whereas a more recent cohort study showed no significant association between PIPs and colorectal neoplasia (CRN) [8]. The authors of this study aimed to use a large cohort study to further define the risk of CRN and PIPs in patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.  

Posted in Y-ECCO Literature Reviews, ECCO News, Volume 14, Issue 3, Committee News, Y-ECCO

11October2019

Y-ECCO Literature Review: Paul Harrow

Paul Harrow

Crohn’s Disease exclusion diet plus partial enteral nutrition induces sustained remission in a randomized controlled trial

Levine A, Wine E, Assa A, Boneh RS, Shaoul R, Kori M, Cohen S, Peleg S, Shamaly H, On A, Millman P, Abramas L, Ziv-Baran T, Grant S, Abitbol G, Dunn KA, Bielawski JP, Van Limbergen J

Gastroenterology. 2019;157:440–50.

Introduction

Paul Harrow picture
Paul Harrow
© Paul Harrow

Exclusive enteral nutrition (EEN) is a safe and effective induction treatment for Crohn’s Disease (CD). It is recommended as first-line induction therapy in children and adolescents [1]. However, enteral nutrition is less well tolerated than other options like corticosteroids. A recent meta-analysis found three times as many patients withdrew from enteral nutrition therapy compared to corticosteroids even in the supported setting of clinical trials [2]. There is a clear need for a more acceptable dietary intervention. However, our understanding of the role of diet in CD is incomplete and to date specific diets have not been proven to induce remission. 

Posted in Y-ECCO Literature Reviews, ECCO News, Volume 14, Issue 3, Committee News, Y-ECCO

11October2019

Y-ECCO Literature Review: Samantha Campbell

Samantha Campbell

Ustekinumab exposure-outcome analysis in Crohn’s Disease only in part explains limited endoscopic remission rates

Verstockt B, Dreesen E, Noman M, Outtier A, Van den Berghe N, Aerden I, Compernolle G, Van Assche G, Gils A, Vermeire S, Ferrante M

J Crohns Colitis. 2019;13:864–72.

Introduction

Samantha Campbell picture
Samantha Campbell
© Samantha Campbell

Ustekinumab is licenced to treat moderate-severe Crohn’s Disease (CD) [1]. Ustekinumab induction is administered via intravenous (IV) infusion at a dose of 6 mg/kg at week 0, followed by a subcutaneous (SC) maintenance injection of 90 mg at week 8.

The UNITI programme demonstrated that ustekinumab can induce and maintain clinical remission. However, there is a paucity of real-life data in patients with CD receiving the mentioned IV induction and SC maintenance dosing of ustekinumab. Real-life data on therapeutic drug monitoring and biomarkers, such as faecal calprotectin, remain a relatively unexplored area with ustekinumab, with discrepancies in the literature [2, 3]. . 

Posted in Y-ECCO Literature Reviews, ECCO News, Volume 14, Issue 3, Committee News, Y-ECCO

11October2019

Y-ECCO Members’ Address

Dominik Bettenworth, Y-ECCO Chair

Dominik Bettenworth 2Dominik Bettenworth
© ECCO

Dear Y-ECCO Friends,

I hope you all are doing well.

During my summer leave, I read a book on the time horizon principle. The author supposes that the productivity of the most successful people on the planet results from the balance between three core components: Time for yourself, relationships and work. As you all, hopefully, have had sufficient time for yourself and your family during your holidays, here are some ways to expand your (professional) relationships and work skills:  

Posted in ECCO News, Volume 14, Issue 3, Committee News, Y-ECCO

11October2019

Challenges in the diagnosis of diversion colitis

Monika Tripathi, H-ECCO Member

Monika Tripathi wrc 2018
Monika Tripathi
© ECCO

Elective or emergency surgical interventions in the management of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) are mainly reserved for patients with medical refractory disease and life-threatening complications. Approximately 20%–30% of Ulcerative Colitis (UC) and 70%–80% of Crohn’s Disease (CD) patients will need surgery within the first to second decade following primary disease diagnosis [1].

Posted in ECCO News, Volume 14, Issue 3, Committee News, H-ECCO

11October2019

Fighting for growth in paediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Amit Assa*/**, P-ECCO Member

Amit Assa 2019
Amit Assa
© ECCO

Growth retardation is commonly seen in children diagnosed with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), mainly those with Crohn's Disease (CD). The aetiology of poor growth in children with IBD is multifactorial and includes malnutrition, poor intake, increased nutritional needs, elevated inflammatory cytokines, genetic factors (parental height, CD susceptibility genes) and corticosteroid therapy. Growth retardation may be present years before diagnosis of IBD, and it commonly persists despite disease-specific treatments, with implications for final adult height and consequent social and psychological burden.

Posted in ECCO News, Volume 14, Issue 3, Committee News, P-ECCO

11October2019

13th European Colorectal Congress of St. Gallen

Michel Adamina, S-ECCO Member

Michel AdaminaMichel Adamina
© ECCO

The 13th European Colorectal Congress starts on Sunday December 1, 2019 with a Masterclass in Colorectal Surgery and ends on Thursday December 5, 2019. About 1,400 participants from 80 countries are expected to attend the St. Gallen Colorectal Week (www.colorectalsurgery.eu, @ECCongress). Michel Adamina, from S-ECCO, is co-organising the meeting.

Posted in ECCO News, Volume 14, Issue 3, Committee News, S-ECCO

11October2019

Nutritional management in patients after pouch surgery

Lihi Godny, D-ECCO Member


Lihi Godny 2019
Lihi Godny
© ECCO

Total proctocolectomy with ileal pouch anal anastomosis (IPAA) is the surgery of choice for patients with refractory Ulcerative Colitis (UC). Following the first-year post operatively the pouch is adapted to the ileal content efflux and most patients have 5-8 bowel movements a day and one nocturnal. Stool and gas incontinence, episodic nocturnal soiling and use of anti-diarrheal medications are common1–4. Since patients often relate symptoms to food (especially fruit and vegetable, dairy products and spicy foods), food avoidance is prevalent in up to 70% of the patients5. Therefore, patients after pouch surgery should be routinely assessed and treated by a dietitian within the setting of a multidisciplinary team6.

Nutritional deficiencies including iron, vitamin B12 and vitamin D are common and should be monitored and addressed7. Fluids and electrolytes imbalances are common in patients with increased number of bowel movements and need to be managed in order to avoid dehydration.

Posted in ECCO News, Volume 14, Issue 3, Committee News, D-ECCO

11October2019

IBD Nurse Education Programme - 2nd F2F Meeting

Wladzia Czuber-Dochan and Petra Hartmann, N-ECCO Members

Wadyslawa Czuber Dochan
Wladzia Czuber-Dochan 
© ECCO
Petra Hartmann wrc 2018
Petra Hartmann
© ECCO

The ECCO IBD Nurse Education Programme was introduced in 2018, with Italy being chosen as the first country to run the Programme. The Programme consists of two face-to-face meetings, one at the beginning and one at the end of the Programme, six online modules that nurses complete as self-directed learning, and a one-week visit to an IBD centre in the home country. The Programme, which ran from November 2018 to May 2019, was coordinated by an experienced IBD Nurse, Simona Radice, with help and support from Gionata Fiorino, consultant gastroenterologist. Both Simona and Gionata work at Humanitas Hospital in Milan, where the face-to-face meetings took place.

Posted in ECCO News, Volume 14, Issue 3, Committee News, N-ECCO