Y-ECCO
11October2019

Y-ECCO Interview Corner: Fiona Powrie

Charlotte Hedin, Y-ECCO Member

Charlotte HedinCharlotte Hedin
© ECCO

Professor Fiona Powrie is the Director of the Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology at the University of Oxford. Her work has been seminal in defining the mechanisms that govern and regulate immune responses in the gut. Her research has revealed the pivotal role of regulatory T cells, interleukin-10, interleukin-23 and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) in intestinal inflammation.

Posted in Volume 14, Issue 3, ECCO News, Committee News, Y-ECCO

11October2019

Y-ECCO Literature Review: Sailish Honap

Sailish Honap

No association between pseudopolyps and colorectal neoplasia in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases

Mahmoud R, Shah SC, Ten Hove JR, Torres J, Mooiweer E, Castaneda D, Glass J, Elman J, Kumar A, Axelrad J, Ullman T, Colombel JF, Oldenburg B, Itzkowitz SH; Dutch Initiative on Crohn and Colitis

Gastroenterology. 2019;156:1333–44.e3.

Introduction

Sailish Honap picture
Sailish Honap
© Sailish Honap

Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) are at an increased risk of developing high-grade dysplasia and colorectal carcinoma [1, 2]. The risk of carcinogenesis, driven by chronic inflammation, increases with several factors, including duration and anatomic extent of colitis, family history and the presence of primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). European clinical guidelines for colonoscopy surveillance in this high-risk cancer population also suggest a shorter surveillance interval for those with post-inflammatory polyps (PIPs), also known as pseudopolyps [3–5]. PIPs are a common finding, more so in Ulcerative Colitis (UC) than in Crohn’s Disease, and are formed after alternating cycles of inflammation and regeneration of the epithelial mucosa. However, data are conflicting and evidence is lacking in this field as previous case control studies have reported up to a 2.5-fold increased risk [6, 7] whereas a more recent cohort study showed no significant association between PIPs and colorectal neoplasia (CRN) [8]. The authors of this study aimed to use a large cohort study to further define the risk of CRN and PIPs in patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.  

Posted in Y-ECCO Literature Reviews, Volume 14, Issue 3, ECCO News, Committee News, Y-ECCO

11October2019

Y-ECCO Literature Review: Paul Harrow

Paul Harrow

Crohn’s Disease exclusion diet plus partial enteral nutrition induces sustained remission in a randomized controlled trial

Levine A, Wine E, Assa A, Boneh RS, Shaoul R, Kori M, Cohen S, Peleg S, Shamaly H, On A, Millman P, Abramas L, Ziv-Baran T, Grant S, Abitbol G, Dunn KA, Bielawski JP, Van Limbergen J

Gastroenterology. 2019;157:440–50.

Introduction

Paul Harrow picture
Paul Harrow
© Paul Harrow

Exclusive enteral nutrition (EEN) is a safe and effective induction treatment for Crohn’s Disease (CD). It is recommended as first-line induction therapy in children and adolescents [1]. However, enteral nutrition is less well tolerated than other options like corticosteroids. A recent meta-analysis found three times as many patients withdrew from enteral nutrition therapy compared to corticosteroids even in the supported setting of clinical trials [2]. There is a clear need for a more acceptable dietary intervention. However, our understanding of the role of diet in CD is incomplete and to date specific diets have not been proven to induce remission. 

Posted in Y-ECCO Literature Reviews, Volume 14, Issue 3, ECCO News, Committee News, Y-ECCO

11October2019

Y-ECCO Literature Review: Samantha Campbell

Samantha Campbell

Ustekinumab exposure-outcome analysis in Crohn’s Disease only in part explains limited endoscopic remission rates

Verstockt B, Dreesen E, Noman M, Outtier A, Van den Berghe N, Aerden I, Compernolle G, Van Assche G, Gils A, Vermeire S, Ferrante M

J Crohns Colitis. 2019;13:864–72.

Introduction

Samantha Campbell picture
Samantha Campbell
© Samantha Campbell

Ustekinumab is licenced to treat moderate-severe Crohn’s Disease (CD) [1]. Ustekinumab induction is administered via intravenous (IV) infusion at a dose of 6 mg/kg at week 0, followed by a subcutaneous (SC) maintenance injection of 90 mg at week 8.

The UNITI programme demonstrated that ustekinumab can induce and maintain clinical remission. However, there is a paucity of real-life data in patients with CD receiving the mentioned IV induction and SC maintenance dosing of ustekinumab. Real-life data on therapeutic drug monitoring and biomarkers, such as faecal calprotectin, remain a relatively unexplored area with ustekinumab, with discrepancies in the literature [2, 3]. . 

Posted in Y-ECCO Literature Reviews, Volume 14, Issue 3, ECCO News, Committee News, Y-ECCO

11October2019

Y-ECCO Members’ Address

Dominik Bettenworth, Y-ECCO Chair

Dominik Bettenworth 2Dominik Bettenworth
© ECCO

Dear Y-ECCO Friends,

I hope you all are doing well.

During my summer leave, I read a book on the time horizon principle. The author supposes that the productivity of the most successful people on the planet results from the balance between three core components: Time for yourself, relationships and work. As you all, hopefully, have had sufficient time for yourself and your family during your holidays, here are some ways to expand your (professional) relationships and work skills:  

Posted in Volume 14, Issue 3, ECCO News, Committee News, Y-ECCO

12June2019

Y-ECCO Interview Corner: David Rampton

Charlotte Hedin, Y-ECCO Member

Charlotte HedinCharlotte Hedin
© ECCO

Early clinical trials, the advent of biologics and the IBD Nurse and how the clinical presentation of IBD has changed over a 46-year career: The interviewee in this issue is Professor David Rampton, who has had a long career as an IBD clinician and researcher in East London. Respected by colleagues and patients alike, his career has spanned an era during which much has changed in IBD.

Posted in ECCO News, Volume 14, Issue 2, Committee News, Y-ECCO

12June2019

Y-ECCO Literature Review: Rohit Rao

Rohit Rao

Rates and characteristics of postcolonoscopy colorectal cancer in the Swedish IBD population: What are the differences from a non-IBD population?

Stjärngrim J, Ekbom A, Hammar U, Hultcrantz R, Forsberg AM

Gut 2018 Dec 15; doi: 10.1136/gutjnl-2018-316651

Introduction

Rohit Rao 3
Rohit Rao 
© Rohit Rao

Individuals with IBD have an increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) [1, 2]. In an effort to address this, societal guidelines recommend surveillance colonoscopy 8–10 years after diagnosis and at varying intervals thereafter, depending on risk [3, 4]. A 2017 Cochrane systematic review [5] demonstrated a benefit in this strategy, noting reductions in the development of both CRC and the rate of CRC‐associated death. Despite this, dysplasia detection is challenging and CRC still accounts for 10%–15% of all IBD deaths [6, 7]. Of further concern is the reported increased rate of post-colonoscopy colorectal cancer (PCCRC) in IBD. 

Posted in Y-ECCO Literature Reviews, ECCO News, Volume 14, Issue 2, Committee News, Y-ECCO

12June2019

Y-ECCO Literature Review: Misha Kabir

Misha Kabir

Predictors of anti-TNF treatment failure in anti-TNF-naive patients with active luminal Crohn’s disease: A prospective, multicentre, cohort study

Kennedy NA, Heap GA, Green HD, Hamilton B, Bewshea C, Walker GJ, Thomas A, Nice R, Perry MH, Bouri S, Chanchlani N, Heerasing NM, Hendy P, Lin S, Gaya DR, Cummings JRF, Selinger CP, Lees CW, Hart AL, Parkes M, Sebastian S, Mansfield JC, Irving PM, Lindsay J, Russell RK, McDonald TJ, McGovern D, Goodhand JR, Ahmad T, UK Inflammatory Bowel Disease Pharmacogenetics Study Group*

Lancet Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2019;4:341–53

Introduction

Misha Kabir photo2
Misha Kabir 
© Misha Kabir

The anti-TNF monoclonal antibodies infliximab and adalimumab have been integral to the management of Crohn’s Disease over the past two decades. However, primary non-response and secondary loss of response in the first year of treatment remain common, at 10%–40% [1–3] and 23%–46% [4] respectively. Immunogenicity has been implicated as an important predictive factor for anti-TNF therapy failure. However, target-to-treat drug and anti-drug antibody concentrations have not yet been validated in an adequately powered prospective study. The Personalised Anti-TNF Therapy in Crohn’s Disease Study (PANTS) aimed to investigate the factors that predict primary non-response, non-remission and adverse events with anti-TNF therapy in luminal Crohn’s Disease.

Posted in Y-ECCO Literature Reviews, ECCO News, Volume 14, Issue 2, Committee News, Y-ECCO

12June2019

Y-ECCO Literature Review: Georgina Cunningham

Georgina Cunningham

Early combined immunosuppression may be effective and safe in older patients with Crohn’s disease: post hoc analysis of REACT

Singh S, Stitt LW, Zou G, et al.

Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2019;49:1188–94.

Introduction

GCunningham photo
Georgina Cunningham 
© Georgina Cunningham

Due to the ageing population and the chronicity of the disease, increasing numbers of patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) are now over the age of 60 [1]. The management of IBD in this group poses some challenges, mainly centered on the balance between risk of immunosuppression and the burden of active disease [2]. Although older IBD patients usually display a more indolent disease course, they are more likely to be hospitalised and have higher in-hospital mortality than their younger counterparts [3]. There is no doubt that there is room for improvement in our management of IBD in elderly patients, and guidance is needed to help physicians decide whether more aggressive treatment strategies, widely accepted in certain younger IBD patients [4], are also warranted in this cohort, and especially those at high risk of disease complications.

Posted in Y-ECCO Literature Reviews, ECCO News, Volume 14, Issue 2, Committee News, Y-ECCO

12June2019

Y-ECCO Members’ Address

Dominik Bettenworth, Y-ECCO Chair

Dominik Bettenworth 2Dominik Bettenworth
© ECCO

Dear Y-ECCO Friends,

One of the main tasks of the Young ECCO Committee (Y-ECCO) is to offer Y-ECCO Members opportunities to expand their scientific skills and develop their own research projects. Following the last Y-ECCO Basic Science Workshop in Copenhagen, which was a great success in terms of attendance and participant feedback, plans for the 6th Y-ECCO Basic Science Workshop at the 15th Congress of ECCO in Vienna 2020 are already in full swing. The potential for the successful establishment of intestinal organoids will substantially expand the basic research on Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD). In addition, experimental research should always focus on an effective translation of experimental results into the clinic in order to improve the treatment of our IBD patients in the long term. Therefore, organoids and translational basic science research will be the two main topics of the 6th Y-ECCO Basic Science Workshop. Fortunately, we were able to expand the structure of the workshop so that three awardees of the ECCO Research Fellowships Programme will present their results at the workshop and will also be available to answer all your questions regarding the pros and cons of a fellowship. 

Posted in ECCO News, Volume 14, Issue 2, Committee News, Y-ECCO