EpiCom
13October2022

New EpiCom member

Valerie Pittet, EpiCom Chair


Valerie Pittet 
© ECCO

As you probably know ECCO Members have to step down and new members take their place - that means fresh ideas and various perspectives are heard, leading to renewed enthusiasm that will drive the EpiCom agenda for the future. The Epidemiological Committee  would like to welcome Ravi Misra as board member, while saying good bye to former Chair Naila Arebi.

Posted in ECCO News, Committee News, Volume 17, Issue 3, EpiCom

15June2022

Genetics of IBD: the most relevant Genetics abstracts at ECCO’22

Behrooz Z. Alizadeh, EpiCom Member


Behrooz Z. Alizadeh
© ECCO

A total of ten abstracts focusing on IBD genetics were accepted for presentation at the 17th Congress of ECCO. Four abstracts were presented in the scientific programme (OP) and two in digital oral presentation (DOP) sessions. The remaining four abstracts were presented as posters (eP). I describe here the most interesting findings from different domains of genetics in IBD.

Posted in ECCO News, Committee News, ECCO'22, Volume 17, Issue 2, EpiCom

15June2022

Epidemiology of IBD: the most relevant epidemiological abstracts at ECCO’22

Behrooz Z. Alizadeh, EpiCom Member


Behrooz Z. Alizadeh
© ECCO

A total of 72 abstracts focusing on IBD epidemiology were accepted for presentation at the 17th Congress of ECCO. Among the best abstracts, seven were presented in digital oral presentation (DOP) sessions. The remaining 65 abstracts were presented as posters. Below, I summarise the most interesting studies, covering various fields in the epidemiology of IBD.

Posted in ECCO News, Committee News, ECCO'22, Volume 17, Issue 2, EpiCom

28April2022

6th EpiCom Workshop: Overview of prognostic factors and outcomes in IBD

Ravi Misra, EpiCom Member

Ravi Misra
© Ravi Misra

The Epidemiological Committee (EpiCom) organised the 6th EpiCom Workshop at the ECCO’22 Virtual Congress. The delegates were welcomed by EpiCom chair, Naila Arebi.

The opening presentation was a tandem talk by Naila Arebi and Valérie Pittet on core outcomes relevant to prognostic factors. The two different types of prognostic study, natural history and clinical course, were described, with identification of their strengths and weaknesses. Emphasis was placed on the importance of these studies in paving the way for personalised medicine by identifying high-risk groups and tailoring treatment accordingly. However, a significant limitation is the heterogeneity of outcomes, which limits comparison. Indeed, over 200 different outcomes have been described for Crohn’s Disease (CD) alone.

Posted in ECCO News, Committee News, ECCO'22, EpiCom, Volume 17, Issue 1

16December2021

A core outcome set for real-world evidence – the dawn of a new era for real-world studies

Naila Arebi, EpiCom Chair

Naila Arebi 
© ECCO

The level of confidence in evidence generated by research is reflected in various aspects of study design and underpins clinical guidelines in Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD). The quality of research study designs, each with inherent strengths and limitations, determines confidence in the results, and it is acknowledged that some ‘robust’ study designs may not be feasible in specific contexts [1, 2]. Experimental designs such as randomised controlled studies that are characterised by methodological rigour, may be unsuitable to study effectiveness owing to their weak external validity, which is attributable to their strict eligibility criteria. Reliance on complementary or alternative evidence from other study designs to address residual gaps in knowledge is not uncommon. Non-experimental observational study designs capture a more diverse population, albeit in a less stringent setting, resulting in several methodological limitations, including high risk of bias and unbalanced confounders [2]. The increasing digitalisation of medicine, in addition to accessible diverse sources of data, is partly responsible for recent intensification of interest in evidence generated by analysing data from observational studies with the purpose of offering new insights into the effectiveness and safety of interventions as well as understanding healthcare delivery and quality of care. The systematic analysis of data from multiple data sources outside a research setting is referred to as real-world studies (RWS), and its subsequent analysis and conclusions as real-world evidence (RWE) [3].

Posted in ECCO News, Committee News, EpiCom, Volume 16, Issue 4

17September2021

Best epidemiological abstracts at ECCO’21

Valerie Pittet & Julien Kirchgesner, EpiCom Members

Valerie Pittet
© ECCO


Julien Kirchgesner
© ECCO

A total of 76 abstracts focussing on IBD epidemiology were accepted for presentation at the 16th Congress of ECCO. Among the ten best abstracts, one was presented in the scientific programme and nine in digital oral presentation (DOP) sessions. The remaining 66 abstracts were presented as posters.

Posted in ECCO News, Committee News, EpiCom, ECCO'21, Volume 16, Issue 3

29April2021

Personalised medicine in IBD

Behrooz Alizadeh, EpiCom Member

Behrooz Alizadeh 
© ECCO

Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is a chronic relapsing and remitting disease of the gut. IBD has a lifelong adverse impact on quality of life and imposes a significant burden on health care [1, 2]. The pathogenesis and course of IBD involve pathogenomic crosstalk among several complex internal components [3, 4], namely the genome [5], epigenome [3, 4], metabolome [3, 4, 6], immunome and microbiome [6–9]; this crosstalk is generally triggered through a set of external complex interactions among the exposome [10–13], dietome [14, 15], lifestyle, social and behavioural factors [16]. While some of these multi-level interactions trigger the disease, others drive the disease course. Therefore, in each IBD patient the disease arises through a (unique) combination of pathogenenomic (risk) factors or pathway that yield a specific set of disease manifestations and a specific disease course. In this context, an “individualized” therapy is required [17–19].

Posted in ECCO News, Committee News, EpiCom, Volume 16, Issue 2

25March2021

Digital care and inflammatory bowel diseases

Sophie Restellini, EpiCom Member

Sophie Restellini 
© ECCO

Digital health is a broad concept encompassing categories such as mobile health (mHealth), health information technology (HIT), wearable devices, telehealth and telemedicine, with several aims, one of which  is to foster the development of personalised medicine [1, 2].

Digital care meets the same requirements as in-person medicine (regarding ethics, patient consent, authentication of health professionals, report of consultation in the patient's file). Pre-COVID-19 this model of care was successfully used to monitor patients with a variety of chronic illnesses, and it gained traction after the emergence of COVID-19 because of the emerging need to apply alternative ways of delivering healthcare without human contact.

Posted in ECCO News, Committee News, EpiCom, Volume 16, Issue 1

15December2020

The exposome and personalised medicine in IBD

Behrooz Z. Alizadeh, EpiCom Member

Berhooz Z. Alizadeh 
© ECCO

Introduction

In the past few decades, the incidence of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD) started rising especially in industrialised Western countries, affecting more than two million Americans and Europeans [1–3]. At the turn of the twenty-first century, however, IBD became a global disease, rapidly affecting the Eastern and Southern developing nations [3–5]. So, the global prevalence of IBD is currently estimated at 0.7% and is expected to increase to 1% by 2030 [1, 3, 6].The rise in IBD has coincided with an increase in urbanisation, sanitisation, and adoption of a Western lifestyle [4], as well as advances in infrastructure, better access to healthcare, and increased awareness of community following socioeconomic development. It is therefore assumed that the primary suspect underlying the globalisation of IBD is the alteration of the human environment, called the exposome (meaning exposures to environmental and lifestyle factors throughout life, starting at conception), and the associated embracing of Western lifestyles by other nations [6].

Posted in ECCO News, Committee News, EpiCom, Volume 15, Issue 4

30September2020

Inflammatory Bowel Disease and COVID-19

Sophie Restellini and Valerie Pittet, EpiCom Members

Sophie Restellini
© ECCO

Valerie Pittet
© ECCO

Introduction

Infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), leading to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), spread exponentially, with the World Health Organization (WHO) declaring a pandemic on March 11 [1]. By August 15, more than 21,000,000 cases and 755,000 deaths had been reported worldwide [2]. People of any age with certain underlying medical conditions are at increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19.

Posted in ECCO News, Committee News, EpiCom, Volume 15, Issue 3